Kids Not Learning Cursive in Schools

Written by dad - 7 Comments

Guess what? Sometime between Son #2 and Son #3 hitting third grade, our local school district decided to stop teaching cursive. While they’ll still learn to sign their names, they won’t learn to read or write in cursive.

I’m not sure why, but this really bothers. Honestly, I can’t remember the last time I chose to write in cursive, but it still seems like a skill worth having. Thus, we’ll most likely wind up teaching our kids cursive ourselves.

As for why they’ve dropped cursive, we haven’t really gotten a straight answer. My best guess is that they simply want more time to prepare for standardized tests. If that turns out to be the case, I’ll be very unhappy. After all, as pointless as cursive might end up being in the long run, standardized test prep is far more pointless.

Published on November 19th, 2010 - 7 Comments
Filed under: Education
digg this - stumble it - save to del.icio.us

Related articles...

If you found this article useful, please sign up to receive free e-mail updates:

You will receive only the daily updates, and can unsubscribe at anytime.

Comments (scroll down to add your own):

  1. My handwriting is a mixture of cursive and block letters that I can write quickly, efficiently, and illegibly.

    Comment by Blaine Moore — Nov 19th 2010 @ 5:05 pm
  2. Really? Who the hell cares about cursive. It’s an absolute waste of time. There are so many other skills that kids can be learning at that age. I’m actually really glad to hear your school cut it out…

    Comment by Derek — Dec 9th 2010 @ 9:49 pm
  3. My second oldest learned cursive the same summer her older sister was learning it – outside with sidewalk chalk. She learned to print by copying sentences & titles from books. I never taught her to print, but she can do so. She prefers to write in cursive and does so in almost all cases, but especially when she’s composing her own stories.

    I think all kids should be able to read cursive. Sometimes, if a child has really bad handwriting when printing, you can improve it simply by teaching cursive. (Seems weird, but I know of many cases where this has helped, including with my oldest.)

    Most schools concentrate on typing instead of pushing cursive.

    Comment by Doucement — Dec 13th 2010 @ 6:11 pm
  4. Yes, we’ve probably reached a point where being able to write cursive is probably not 100% required for the average working stiff; however, I would say that being able to read cursive is still 100% required just to remain backwards compatible with historical documentation that may not exist in machine readable form. You may end up working for a firm that has older very important documents (medical research or patient records, insurance, legal, real-estate, et cetera) that may only exist in cursive, and because of their very nature, haven’t been and probably won’t be converted to machine readable text due to the cost of the human translation. Also, there’s the romance factor; you may find yourself in competition for a mate, where your beautiful cursive handwritten love letter just might tip the balance over your competition’s cold text message.

    Comment by Scotty — Dec 28th 2010 @ 11:17 pm
  5. To say that preparing for standardized tests is so much more pointless than learning cursive is just ridiculous. While the focus should be much more on students actually learning rather than passing standardized tests, the bottom line is that almost all schools have them and the school’s scores as a whole affect lots of different aspects of the school, such as funding, level of control by the state government, etc. I do not approve of the overemphasis of standardized testing in schools, but for the moment there is nothing that can be done and students do need to be prepared for these tests in the best way possible. As for learning cursive, I think students should learn how to read it but just learn how to sign their names. I never use cursive except when I sign my name and if students do desire to learn cursive they can have it taught to them by their parents or an outside class. It’s not something that is really difficult to be taught outside the classroom.

    Comment by Elizabeth — Mar 24th 2011 @ 6:00 pm
  6. Cursive writing is neat and all, BUT as far as I know, fine motor skills develop at about 10 years of age, so teaching 6-year-old children italics is literally a little premature IMHO.

    I myself abandoned italics towards the end of high school, realizing that I can write much more legibly and neatly in more print-like characters. It’s not like italics gave/took any advantage to/from me in my adult life.

    Comment by Ruben — Aug 24th 2011 @ 3:36 pm
  7. Me too Blaine, my handwriting is a mixture so its fast and readable.

    Comment by Kelly — Nov 1st 2011 @ 2:12 pm

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Get free updates...

Articles via e-mail:

Search this site...

Sponsors...

Popular topics...

Recent articles...

Recent comments...

  • Nan: Believe me when I tell you that allowing disrespect from a child creates...
  • Misty: Hello all… It has been a few years since I last posted and...
  • heather: This is for lovely Maria, who obviously doesn`t understand. I will...
  • Brittney: My son is just 3 and a half years old and was recently diagnosed...
  • Mary Gulledge: Yes they do personalize the autographs…I got one for my...
  • Brooke: Thanks Amy for responding. I have decided to wait on the Intuniv for...
  • Amy: Hi Brooke! My son, now 9 yrs old, has been on Intuniv for 2 and a half...
  • Brooke: My daughter, 10 years old, is in the fifth grade. She is struggling...

Most talked about...