Glasses for a Five Year Old – The Resolution

Written by mom - 5 Comments

I wrote the other day about the trials and tribulations associated with our five year old’s glasses. A number of commenters suggested that we consider changing doctors, and they’ll be please to know that’s exactly what we did.

If you haven’t read Part 1, be sure to do so. If you’ve already read that, then let’s pick back up where we left off…

On our next trip to Sam’s Club following the run-in with the “bad doctor,” I had Son #3’s glasses re-fitted. During the adjustment, I lamented to our favorite Optician that this whole “vision journey” was very confusing to me and filled him in on some of the details. He recommended that I seek a second opinion and gave me the name of the optometrist (not an opthamologist – the difference is basically that an optomoetrist can’t perform surgery) that he used for his own children. Since Son #3 didn’t need surgery this sounded like a good idea.

The optometrist fit him in two days later after I explained that my son was going to start Kindergarten in less than a week and couldn’t see far away with his current prescription. Needless to say, this eye exam (his second in three weeks) was much more extensive. She took her time with him. At the end, she changed his prescription back to bifocals (+2 and +2 this time). When we got home I gave my son his old glasses back. He was positively giddy as he put them on. With a huge smile he giggled, “I can see again!”

The next day, we put his new prescription in at Sam’s Club and waited about a week for his new glasses. In the mean time, he stayed in his old glasses as he started Kindergarten. I planned to have all this vision confusion behind us before school started. Oh well. He could at least see well, so the delay didn’t cause any problems. My son definitely has a new doctor. The fact that she’s an optometrist, and not an opthalmologist, is totally incidental. At least she took the time to make sure this young patient could see! Ironic, isn’t it? I’m certainly seeing things a lot clearer now. When you feel that “Mommy Sense” perk up, seek a second opinion.

Published on August 29th, 2007 - 5 Comments
Filed under: Health
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Comments (scroll down to add your own):

  1. Glad to hear that you were able to resolve this!

    I’d be willing to bet that your previous eye doctor wasn’t bad, he was probably just unused to dealing with children, who have different growth rates and social interaction than teenagers or adults do. If he spends much time performing surgery, it’s probably on elderly folks, who tend to know exactly what they need.

    Comment by Anitra — Aug 29th 2007 @ 3:28 pm
  2. I am glad that your son got taken care of; whether the former doctor was unused to dealing with children or not, it is inconceivable to me that he would think that it is a good idea to go without being able to see for anybody for two months unless (a) the person went through corrective surgery and there is a healing process or (b) the person is trying to go without glasses and train their eyes to work without visual aids.

    In the case of your son, being unable to see could set him really far back. I had vision problems as a kid, and it was hard enough not being able to see on a temporary basis; I can’t imagine it on a day to day basis. (I suffered from cluster migraines, which at one point got so bad that I went blind for two weeks in high school.)

    Comment by Blaine Moore — Aug 29th 2007 @ 3:45 pm
  3. Wow, Blaine! That sounds scary, especially if you didn’t know the blindness would be temporary. I hope that never happens again.

    Comment by mom — Aug 30th 2007 @ 10:17 am
  4. Anitra-
    You are so right about the age thing. Even though this doctor specializes in pediatrics, they are not his usual clientele. My son is almost always the only one in the waiting room without gray hair. In fact, I forgot to mention that the receptionist thought I was calling on behalf of my father at first. That still doesn’t excuse her reluctance to fit son #3 in to their schedule. Maybe she would have been more accommodating had she checked his birth date, but I doubt it.
    Granted, this doctor may have just had a bad day, but I won’t retract my assertion that he is a bad doctor. Obviously, he didn’t spend enough time with my son to get him the right prescription. That makes him a HORRIBLE doctor from this mom’s perspective.

    Comment by mom — Aug 30th 2007 @ 10:36 am
  5. I was diagnosed in 7th grade (a story in and of itself) and have had migraines as long as I can remember (at least since I was 5 or 6 years old.) So, by the time I was a junior or senior in high school (I misrecall which year it was) I knew that it wasn’t permanent. I was just miserable.

    Comment by Blaine Moore — Aug 31st 2007 @ 8:44 am

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